10 New Salesforce Flow Features to Shout About in Spring ’22

Share this article...

Every time the Salesforce release notes are published, I always jump straight to the Salesforce Flows section because, well, there’s always so much great content that makes the lives of Salesforce Admins a lot easier with each release.

The Spring ’22 update has introduced new improvements – and plenty of them to shout about! Here’s my summary of all that’s coming to Flows…

1. Auto-Layout Enhancements

Auto-Layout is a fairly recent addition to Flows, but with Spring ‘22 it is the default layout for new Flows.

Switching between Auto-Layout and Freeform is now done with a picklist at the top of the page.

Read more: Auto-Layout Enhancements

2. Flow Trigger Explorer

Flow Trigger Explorer is a new feature that allows Admins to see and manage all Record-Triggered Flows on a per-object basis. If you’re ever in an org with a lot of Flow-based automations and are experiencing unexpected automated functionality, you may find there to be an older (but still active) Flow running that you’ve forgotten about. Flow Trigger Explorer makes this process easy!

Flow Trigger Explorer can be opened from the Start Element of any Record-Triggered Flow OR from the button at the top of the Flows List.

Read more: Flow Trigger Explorer

3. Record Collections Can Create Choice Options

Previously collected Record Collections can now be used to create Collection-based Choices to be used in Screen Flows. Rather than having to configure brand new Record Choices, if you’ve already got a Collection of records or values you’d like to use, now it’s as simple as selecting them as the Record Collection source for your Choice Collection Set, as below.

Read more: Record Collections Can Create Choice Options

4. Collection Filter Element

Filter out unwanted data without having to re-query or use a more complex filtration method. Now, with Collection Filter, you can specify conditions that you’d like to remove from a collection. In the example below, I’m removing all Cases from my previouslyCollectedCases Collection that hold a Status of ‘Closed’.

Read more: Collection Filter Element

5. Updates to Screen Flow Fields

The Fields feature of Screen Flow supports the ability to add Phone, Email, and Picklist fields now where it previously couldn’t.

When a dependent picklist field is added to the Flow, both the controlling field and the dependent field must be added.

Read more: Updates to Screen Flow Fields

6. Manage the Order of Execution of Record-Triggered Flows

In an org that has multiple Record-Triggered Flows per object, it’s important to have some form of ability to specify which Flow should come before another. That’s where the new Trigger Order field on the Flow’s Save page comes in.

Admins are able to specify a number between 1 and 2,000 to organise their org’s Flows and assign an order of execution to them. Simple, effective, and bound to make it easier to solve Flows executing in the wrong order when used properly.

Read more: Manage the Order of Execution of Record-Triggered Flows

7. Open Subflows in Flow Builder Directly from the Parent Flow

There’s now a quick and easy way to open a Subflow directly from the parent Flow. Simply click the Subflow element, then click Open Reference Flow. Voila!

Read more: Open Subflows in Flow Builder Directly from the Parent Flow

8. Use the Connect to Element Feature Within a Loop

You can now break out of a Loop using the Connect to Element feature within a For-Each Loop element. This is the correct way of breaking out of a Loop in a Flow, and a much needed addition. One less major reason to pass to Apex!

Read more: Use the Connect to Element Feature Within a Loop

9. Updates to Terminated Flow Paths in Auto-Layout

You can also terminate paths inside Loops in Auto-Layout, or convert Freeform Flows that contain terminated paths inside Loops to Auto-Layout.

Read more: Updates to Terminated Flow Paths in Auto-Layout

10. Shortcuts Allow Quick Creation of Frequently Used Elements

Flow Builder now learns from your habits and offers you some frequently used actions at the top of the Add Element menu as a shortcut.

Read more: Shortcuts Allow Quick Creation of Frequently Used Elements

Bonus! User Experience Changes (2 Updates)

Ah, we’re not done yet! I saw two other Flow updates that I thought supplemented each other quite a bit, and also supplemented the recently released User Experience Designer Certification that Salesforce released.

  • Button Label Translation is now generally available making it easier to support multiple languages within your Flows. This makes it easier to support your larger audience within your Salesforce org.
  • Keyboard and Screen Reader Accessibility Options can also be configured for your Flows as well, making Flows easier to navigate for those who require a Screen reader to navigate and use Salesforce.

Summary

That’s just a small handful of cool new Flow Features coming in the Spring ‘22 release. Be sure to check out our Spring ‘22 round-up.

Sign up to a Spring ‘22 pre-release org yourself and see what you can find.

5 thoughts on “10 New Salesforce Flow Features to Shout About in Spring ’22

  1. So excited about Flow Trigger Explorer and Order of Execution. As an admin in a new org, I want to build with a Flow First mentality and these tools will make it way easier to understand how all my pieces play together

  2. Another honorable mention is that now Approval Process field update changes can trigger flows based on a record update.

  3. I will be curious about the exit/terminate loop options and if those also allow the loop to start over again if you return to it with a newly populated collection. In the past anytime exiting a loop early it’s been difficult to return to that same loop and have it start over again. Been one of those rather unfortunate nuisances about loops which I hope is resolved here.

  4. Is this sentence accurate?
    In the example below, I’m removing all Cases from my previouslyCollectedCases Collection that hold a Status of ‘Closed’.

    I’m thinking it should read:
    In the example below, I’m creating a new collection of Cases from my previouslyCollectedCases Collection that hold a Status of ‘Closed’.

Add Comment